Photo of USTDC courtesy of Les Duffin

Sunday, December 19, 2010

Chiang Ching-kuo

Photo courtesy of Sarj Bloom

Sarj sent me this photograph a few days ago.  He wasn't positive how he came into possession of it but he says the individual on the left is Chiang Ching-kuo, son of  Chiang Kai-shek.  The man on the right appears to be a police officer.  Does anyone have any idea who he is or where this photo was taken?

5 comments:

Mei-Sheng said...

According to the words on this photo, July 45 means July of Republic Year 45 and that's 1956.

As for P.H.Q.Taipei, I think it's Police Headquarters Taipei.

The policeman on the right is wearing a cap which has no decoration on it. And also He carries a sidearm. Therefore, he probly is just an ordinary low-ranking policeman.

Chian Ching-Kuo likes to get along with low-ranking military and government personnel.

George said...

Mei-Sheng,

I agree with your description of the photo. 1956 for the year of the photo seems to be correct and your observation of the cap decoration also seems to be correct. Thanks.

George

Anonymous said...

The location was the front gate of the Police Headquarter in Taipei, which was adjacent to the Executive Yuan and still is.

The person in uniform was Mr. Cheng Wei-Yuen(鄭衛元). His rank at that time was Captain, indicated by the one-bar four-star badge on his chest. Mr. Cheng graduated from the Military (Army) Academy (陸軍軍官學校), 15th class (15期). He was transferred to the police force, which was common during that period of time.

At that time, Capt. Cheng was the company commander within the Police Division of Transportation and Roadway Management, and served as the liaison coordinator in charge of the communication protocols between the police command and the motorcades.

It should be noted that the color of the S-belt was white, instead of the standard khaki color for the typical police uniform. The use of white color was arranged to be consistent with the belt color of the military police, which also matched to their white-color Harley-Davidsons.

In addition to the sidearm, Ray Ban sunglasses was part of the standard issue, which was quite rare in other groups at that time, except the fighter pilots.

He also wore the rank badge at the wrong side. The normal setup should be at the opposite side above the right pocket. We could also note the small badge on his left pocket, below the rank badge. That was the ID tag for the secret service staff.

Regarding the cap, the decoration system in fact came later. During the earlier years, there were no decorations on the caps for either the police or military. It came later when the US style uniforms were adopted.


Anonymous said...

The location was the front gate of the Police Headquarter in Taipei, which was adjacent to the Executive Yuan and still is.

The person in uniform was Mr. Cheng Wei-Yuen(鄭衛元). His rank at that time was Captain, indicated by the one-bar four-star badge on his chest. Mr. Cheng graduated from the Military (Army) Academy (陸軍軍官學校), 15th class (15期). He was transferred to the police force, which was common during that period of time.

At that time, Capt. Cheng was the company commander within the Police Division of Transportation and Roadway Management, and served as the liaison coordinator in charge of the communication protocols between the police command and the motorcades.

It should be noted that the color of the S-belt was white, instead of the standard khaki color for the typical police uniform. The use of white color was arranged to be consistent with the belt color of the military police, which also matched to their white-color Harley-Davidsons.

In addition to the sidearm, Ray Ban sunglasses was part of the standard issue, which was quite rare in other groups at that time, except the fighter pilots.

He also wore the rank badge at the wrong side. The normal setup should be at the opposite side above the right pocket. We could also note the small badge on his left pocket, below the rank badge. That was the ID tag for the secret service staff.

Regarding the cap, the decoration system in fact came later. During the earlier years, there were no decorations on the caps for either the police or military. It came later when the US style uniforms were adopted.

Anonymous said...

The location was the front gate of the Police Headquarter in Taipei, which was adjacent to the Executive Yuan and still is.

The person in uniform was Mr. Cheng Wei-Yuen(鄭衛元). His rank at that time was Captain, indicated by the one-bar four-star badge on his chest. Mr. Cheng graduated from the Military (Army) Academy (陸軍軍官學校), 15th class (15期). He was transferred to the police force, which was common during that period of time.

At that time, Capt. Cheng was the company commander within the Police Division of Transportation and Roadway Management, and served as the liaison coordinator in charge of the communication protocols between the police command and the motorcades.

It should be noted that the color of the S-belt was white, instead of the standard khaki color for the typical police uniform. The use of white color was arranged to be consistent with the belt color of the military police, which also matched to their white-color Harley-Davidsons.

In addition to the sidearm, Ray Ban sunglasses was part of the standard issue, which was quite rare in other groups at that time, except the fighter pilots.

He also wore the rank badge at the wrong side. The normal setup should be at the opposite side above the right pocket. We could also note the small badge on his left pocket, below the rank badge. That was the ID tag for the secret service staff.

Regarding the cap, the decoration system in fact came later. During the earlier years, there were no decorations on the caps for either the police or military. It came later when the US style uniforms were adopted.